Dr. Sudha G. Rajput is the author of Internal Displacement and Conflict: The Kashmiri Pandits in Comparative Perspective (Routledge). Her 31-year career at the World Bank touched on multiple aspects of international development, working on thirteen countries of the former Soviet Union. Her co-authored book chapters appear in Scientific Explorations of Cause and Consequence across Social Contexts (Praeger) and in State, Society, and Minorities in Southeast Asia (Lexington Books). She writes for the Forced Migration Review. Her doctoral research has investigated issues of conflict-induced displacement in Kashmir, with a focus on societal and policy reform, leading her efforts to the development of a graduate course, Refugees and IDP Issues, drawing students from fields of conflict resolution, international development, humanitarian assistance and peacebuilding. She is a Senior Researcher at the Refugee Law Initiative, a U.K. based think-tank. She is a Consultant/Trainer for USAID, designing and conducting capacity building workshops in Khartoum, Sudan, promoting cross-border co-existence. As a Professional Lecturer, at George Washington University, she teaches at the Elliott School of International Affairs, where she brings multi-disciplinary approaches to her course on Refugee and Migrant Crisis. She is a trainer for the Forage Center for Peacebuilding Education, where during a 4-day humanitarian assistance simulation, she coaches students on systematic understanding of protracted displacements. She teaches at the University of Maryland Global Campus, delivering the MBA program for the military students. Her interests on post-conflict issues include her past travels to: Bosnia, Bulgaria, Croatia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kosovo, Macedonia, Montenegro, Serbia, Sudan, and Ukraine. Sudha’s blog on internal displacement can be found at www.internaldisplacement.info. Dr. Rajput lives in Washington, D.C. and can be reached at sudha_rajput@yahoo.com

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Author's posts

Internal Displacement and Conflict:

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The Displaced Ethnic Serbs from Kosovo

Kosovo and Serbia still embrace the long-running dispute In exchange for normalizing relations, Kosovo fears border changes and territory swaps by Serbia which is bound to resuscitate old animosities in the two former regions within the Yugoslavia federation. Kosovo is no longer a province of Serbia, it lost that right in 2008, after Kosovo declared …

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Sudha Rajput – Forced Migration Review May 2016

My article ‘Transitional Policies and Durable Solutions for Displaced Kashmiri Pandits’ appears in FORCED MIGRATION REVIEW, OXFORD University Press, U.K. http://www.fmreview.org/solutions/rajput.html?utm_source=FMR+52+Thinking+ahead%3A+displacement%2C+transition%2C+solutions+-+online&utm_campaign=FMR+Alert+Eng+52+online&utm_medium=email

Non-displaced KPs too talk of unmet demands!

http://www.tribuneindia.com/news/jammu-kashmir/valley-pandits-trying-to-keep-tradition-alive/205463.html Valley Pandits trying to keep tradition alive Published on: Mar 7, 2016, 12:30 AM M Aamir Khan Tribune News Service Srinagar, March 6 On the eve of Shivaratri today, the non-migrants Pandits said they were struggling to keep their age-old traditions alive and continued to face neglect from the successive governments. “On Herath (Shivaratri), …

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Addressing Displacement – a Revisit

#AcrossBorders and origins: Can we get smarter at preventing people from fleeing? By Flavie Halais flaviehalais29 February 2016 A family on their donkeys arrive at their new settlement in Zam Zam camp for internally displaced people in North Darfur. The nature of displacement crises has evolved. How can the international community do a better job …

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One Darfur community is sick of fighting – bringing peace back

http://www.globalpost.com/article/6736564/2016/02/22/darfur-conflict-peace Feb 26 2016 The Darfur conflict erupted in 2003, leading to the death and displacement of hundreds of thousands of Sudanese citizens and capturing the world’s attention. Three years later, the Darfur Peace Agreement was signed — but the war raged on. Then, in 2011, came another peace agreement, the Doha Document for Peace …

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Displaced Kashmiri Pandits want status change to IDPs

Excelsior Correspondent Displaced Kashmiri Pandits plead for status change from ‘Migrant’ to IDPs Youth for PK meets British MP JAMMU, Feb 21: A high power delegation of Youth for Panun Kashmir (PK)-the frontline youth wing of Panun Kashmir today held a meeting with the British MP Bob Blackman who is on a visit to India …

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Sudan’s national dialogue – a test for government’s commitment

http://www.usip.org/olivebranch/2016/02/11/sudan-s-national-dialogue-poses-test-government-s-commitment Sudan’s National Dialogue Poses Test to Government’s Commitment Thursday, February 11, 2016 By: Susan Stigant In Sudan, a country still struggling with violent conflict in Darfur and two other states, almost 700 participants in a national dialogue process are finalizing recommendations after three months of vigorous and genuine discussion. But legacies of tension and …

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Displaced KPs continue to fight – right to return

December 28, 2015 Displaced KPs continue to fight for their right to return, led by the group’s NGOs to choose to return to a “Separate homeland”. On December 28, 1991, KPs first raised their demand for a “distinct homeland” within the Kashmir Valley, from which they were forcibly evicted in 1989/90, the new homeland to …

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Displaced Serbians accommodate incoming Syrian Refugees

Where Wars Collide: Inside a Serbian Center Home to Refugees Old and New By Sara Elizabeth Williams November 23, 2015 | 10:41 am Afghani teenager Khalil squinted in the winter Balkan sunshine and winced as he flexed his left bicep, red and inflamed where a police dog bit him a few days back, in Bulgaria. …

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